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DirectAdmin File Structure

Directory Structure

The organization of files into a hierarchy of folders is known as the directory structure. The directory structures is modeled after the hierarchical tree model. Let’s take a closer look at the DirectAdmin directory structure in detail.

 

Apache

/etc/httpd              – Apache

/etc/httpd/conf/         – Configuration files are stored in this directory

/etc/httpd/conf/ssl.crt/    – SSL certificates are stored here

/etc/httpd/conf/ssl.key/   – SSL certificate key stored here

/etc/httpd/conf/extra/    – Contains virtual hosts

/var/log/httpd/          – Apache log

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/httpd start/stop   – For Apache start or stop

 

DirectAdmin

/usr/local/directadmin              – DirectAdmin Installation directory

/usr/local/directadmin/scripts/        – Contains scripts

/var/log/directadmin/               – DirectAdmin log

/usr/local/directadmin/custombuilds   – Contains build scripts

/usr/local/directadmin/data/templates  – DirectAdmin templates

 

Mail

/var/spool/virtual/              – Mail directory

/etc/virtual                    – Email virtual

/etc/exim.conf                 – Configuration file

/var/log/exim/                 – Exim log

/etc/virtual/acrilicos.com         – Domain specific mail settings

/etc/virtual/acrilicos.com/aliases   – Email aliases

/etc/virtual/acrilicos.com/quota    – Email quota

/etc/virtual/acrilicos.com/passwd   – Email password

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/exim start/stop  – For Exim start or stop

 

Named(BIND)

/var/named/etc/namedb/named.conf  – Configuration file

/var/named                      – BIND directory

/etc/namedb/domain.db            – Database files

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/named start/stop   – For DNS start or stop

 

Database

/usr/local/directadmin/conf/mysql.conf   – MySQL password stored here

/etc/my.cnf                         – Configuration file

/usr/local/mysql/data/                – Database path

/var/lib/mysql/                      – MySQL log

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/mysqld start/stop     – MySQL start or stop

 

FTP

/etc/proftpd.conf                 – FTP configuration file

/etc/proftpd.passwd               – FTP password

/etc/proftpd.vhosts.conf            – FTP virtual hosts

/var/log/proftpd/                  – FTP log

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/proftpd start/stop  – FTP start or stop

 

SSHD

/etc/ssh/sshd_conf      – SSHD configuration file

/var/log/messages      – Log

 

If you need any further assistance please contact our support department.

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How to enable LetsEncrypt on DirectAdmin

LetsEncrypt is a free SSL tool that lets you install a very basic free SSL Certificate with 1 click.  It supports multiple domains and sub-domains, and will auto-renew automatically before it expires after it’s ~90 day lifespan.

To enable this feature in DirectAdmin,

ensure you have DirectAdmin 1.50.1 or newer.

  1. If you’re running CentOS 6 or newer, it’s recommended to set DA to allow SNI. This will keep the setup simpler, especially when setting up SSL under an Admin account on the server IP (so it’s not installed globally)
  2. Enable the letsencrypt=1 option in the directadmin.conf
  3. Restart DirectAdmin:
    echo "action=directadmin&value=restart" >> 
    /usr/local/directadmin/data/task.queue; /usr/local/directadmin/dataskq d2000
  4. Add the /.well-known Alias:
    cd /usr/local/directadmin/custombuild
    ./build rewrite_confs
  5. Install the most recent version of the script:
    cd /usr/local/directadmin/custombuild
    ./build update
    ./build letsencrypt

Users should then be able to see the LetsEncrypt option in their ‘Enhanced’ skin via:

User Level -> SSL Certificates
How To Verify Your Domain Ownership On Google Webmaster Console

How To Verify Your Domain Ownership On Google Webmaster Console

Hello guy,

Many people had been asking me for the tutorial on HOW TO VERIFY DOMAIN OWNERSHIP ON GOOGLE WEBMASTER CONSOLE.

Today, we are going to look at this in the best procedure on NET.  I’m going to teach you how to do this on cPanel as this seems to be the most commonly use, this also work with other panels such as DirectAdmin, and even you can also use it on Blogspot, but you may need some other techniques.

  • Step 1.

Open Google Webmaster Console on your browser, then login your Gmail account and click on Add Property.

  • Input your domain and click on CONTINUE button,

Domain ownership verification on webmaster console

  • Now login to your cPanel, under DOMAIN SECTION click on ZONE EDITOR

  • Then you will just click on MANAGE button, to continue.

  • After this, you will have to create the A TXT RECORD for the code that you copied from webmaster console.

  • Create the A TXT RECORD

  • After you have create the txt record, then you will need to go back to Google webmaster console to verify it. This most take some hours

  • If after you click on verify and it shows error, that means the record that you created isn’t yet effective and you may need to wait for some hours and try again till you get the below screenshot message.

 

With this, you should be able to have successfully verify your domain ownership and don’t forget to also submit your sitemap.

ALSO CHECK: How To Link My Blogspot Site To WordPress Blog

How To Fix cPanel Error IP Address Has Changed

Hello guys, many users had severally been complaining about IP Address changed error on Cpanel. Today, i’m going to provide a cure and permanent solution to it as it’s seems to be the simplest way on NET.

Major records, shows that this is due to Dynamic IP system being adopted by some ISP’s (Internet Service Providers).

One very easy way to avoid this error is change you ISP. Yes, its that simple. You could also request for a static IP address from your current ISP.

However, there is a more technical method to resolve this and for some of us who are not so tech savvy, I will stick to the first option if I were you. The one that we are going to talk about today is

ALSO CHECK: How to reset WordPress admin password from frontend and backends

How to Resolve Through cPanel Proxy.

  • Navigate to the Subdomains menu in cPanel and create a subdomain cpanel.

    To access Webmail, create corresponding subdomain, too:

    dynamic_proxy

  • Download cpanelproxy Script

  • Go to File Manager, click on the recently created public_html/cpanel (public_html/webmail), click Upload and select the file on your computer:dynamic_proxy1

  • Go back to the folder and click on the Extract button to extract folder. From now on, you are to use http://cpanel.yourdomain.com and http://webmail.yourdomain.com to access the control panels areas.

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO KNOW: How to Move WordPress from a Subfolder to the Root Directory

With this, you have successfully set and free to go!.

How To Link My Blogspot Site To WordPress Blog

How To Link My Blogspot Site To WordPress Blog

What should & will be transferred?

Before we start, it would be nice to know a few details.

In a perfect world, you would go to one blog, click a button to export it, and it would magically appear on your self-hosted website. While it is still not possible, we at First Site Guide offer a substitution for the magic. Let us move your Blogger site to a self-hosted WordPress.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to transfer the entire site as it looks on Blogger. The style of your blog (theme, extensions, fonts, colors, widgets, etc.) will have to be added separately. You can only transfer the data:

  • Posts & Pages
  • Comments
  • Categories
  • Media
  • Permalinks
  • Feed
  • Authors
  • Traffic

Let’s start the transfer

Side Image

Alright, we are all set to go. While it definitely takes some time to perform each step correctly, moving your blog from Blogger to WordPress is not that hard even if you’re a complete beginner. Do not rush and do not skip steps.

1. Choose the best WordPress hosting

Since you are moving to a self-hosted WordPress, the first step would be finding a WordPress hosting company that will take care of your files. You will need to install WordPress on that host, and you will have to trust the company. You are starting a serious blog now, so you should not take this for granted.

There are dozens of hosting companies that are providing WordPress hosting services. Also, there are hundreds (if not more) websites that compare them. But before you hit the search button on Google or other search engines of your choice to start reading all the reviews, we should warn you that many sites & reviews are paid for. So, you will end up reading fake reviews and bogus opinions on a hosting company that paid to get listed as the best one.

To help you with that, we have thoroughly tested hosting companies and found the best one. If you want to start your self-hosted WordPress journey the right way, host your site with Abollyhost – the perfect solution for your new blog.

If this is your first time registering for a hosting account, we strongly suggest going through our detailed tutorial on how to start a blog which will show you how to open a Abollyhost account step by step.

2. Install WordPress

Congratulations! You have joined a family of millions of happy bloggers who trust their sites to Abollyhost. You will soon realize it was a clever choice. Now that your account is ready, you can move on and install WordPress.

Did we mention that Abollyhost loves WordPress users? Because of that, you get to install WordPress in just a few clicks of the mouse button:

  1. Log in to your Abollyhost cPanel account
  2. Please go to the Website section
  3. Select Install WordPress
  4. Click the Install button
  5. Choose the domain name to install it to (in the field next to it, you can enter a subfolder such as ‘blog’ or leave it blank if you want the site’s main page to be the blog)
  6. Now click “advanced options” if you want to change the email address, username, and password for the new WordPress installation
  7. Read through the license and service agreements and check the boxes if you agree with everything (you have to agree in order to continue)
  8. Click the Install Now button

This is definitely the easiest way of installing WordPress. If you’re just trying to move the blog as soon as possible, we recommend that option.

3. Export your blog from Blogger

This is it. It is finally time to export the data from your (let’s call it old) blog that you have started on Blogger. You will need to take all the data from it and store into a file. Don’t worry; you won’t have to create files manually or copy the data. There is actually a button you will need to click and everything will be done in a jiffy:

Overview Stats

  1. Log in to your Blogger account
  2. Go to Settings -> Other which will open the settings page
  3. On top of the page, find “Import & back up” section
  4. Find and click the “Back up Content” button
  5. A pop-up window will appear. Click “Save on your computer” button.

After clicking the button, Blogger will start downloading the XML file that contains all the important data from your blog. Depending on how much content you have, the file may be smaller or larger. You will end up having a file named blog with the date of export. For example: “blog-05-06-2018.xml”.

Locate the file (you can copy it to your desktop so you can find it more easily) and you are officially done with the export. This part wasn’t that scary, right?

4. Import the data to WordPress

If you haven’t skipped steps of this guide, you already have a hosting account and a WordPress site ready to be set up. Let’s import the data from Blogger to WordPress:

Dashboard

  1. Log in to your WordPress website
  2. Go to Tools -> Import
  3. Find Blogger on the list (it should be the first option, on top of the list)
  4. Click “Install now” link and wait for a few seconds for WordPress to finish installing the plugin

After the installation is complete, WordPress will show you a notification if the tool was installed successfully. The same notification will have the link to run the importer. Alternatively, you can click the link to Run Importer from the same spot where you found the install link.

Import

  1. Click “Run Importer” link
  2. On the new page, click “Choose File” button
  3. Search for the XML file you downloaded in the previous step (desktop or any other folder where you left it)
  4. If necessary (depending on the size of the file, your internet connection speed, and your host) wait for a few seconds until the file loads
  5. Click on “Upload file and import” button when possible

Again, depending on the various aspects, this might take a few seconds, so please be patient. When the import is complete, WordPress will show you a new page where you will need to assign the author to the imported posts. Let us show you how to do that in the next step.

4.1. Help, the file is too big to upload!

Usually, WordPress puts a limitation on the maximum file size you can upload. The limit might differ, but you can always manually increase if it necessary. If your exported file was simply too large, you will need to change the maximum upload size for WordPress. If you want to check your current upload limit, please go to Media -> Add New and find the information on the bottom of the screen.

Alright, let’s change that limit so you can import the blog without problems:

  1. Login to your Abollyhost Control Panel
  2. Open the File Manager
  3. Chose to go to the Web Root and click Go
  4. Scroll in the right-hand panel and find file php.ini -> right-click it
  5. Select Code Edit in the pop-up menu
  6. Click Edit at the bottom of the pop-up
  7. Use the keyboard shortcut to open the find pop-up window
  8. Windows and Linux: Ctrl + f
  9. Mac: Command (⌘) + f
  10. Type upload_max_filesize in the search field and hit enter
  11. This will highlight upload_max_filesize = 50M. Change 50M to the size you need. For example 128M
  12. Open the find pop-up, again and in the Search text field type post_max_size and press enter
  13. Highlighted will be post_max_size = 50M. This will need to be changed to the same number as what was put in for upload_max_filesize

Click Save changes

5. Assign an author

If you have had a lot of posts on your Blogger blog, it might be difficult to recognize them without changing authors. That’s especially true if you are importing the blog to a WordPress site that was already running. To help you with that, WordPress lets you reassign the author of the imported item to an existing user of the site.

WordPress will show a list of existing authors you can assign the content to.

If it’s a new site, you will probably have just one user that you created during the installation of the content management system. So, you can select the name for the list, and the content that you are importing will be automatically assigned to that user.

Import

But if you would like to separate the content from the new one that you are going to add, later on, you can also create a new user directly from this page. In that case, you can write the name of a new user. Its user role will be set to subscriber and password will be randomly generated. You can change the user details later on.

After deciding whom to assign the content to, click the “Submit” button and you are all done.

6. Setting up permalinks

The content is successfully imported, and you are one more step closer to having your entire Blogger blog added to your new self-hosted WordPress site. Permalinks are URLs that WordPress uses when organizing posts & pages.
Each post, page, media file, etc. have to have a unique permalink (the address) to work properly. Permalinks might have a huge impact on your site and SEO. And while you can set them up as you wish when starting a new website, we would suggest a different approach when importing a site from Blogger.

Blogger uses month & name to distinguish permalinks. So, if you go to any of your Blogger posts, you will see that it looks something like this: https://demoblog.blogspot. com/2018/05/this-is-post-title.html

In order to keep things in order, we suggest changing the permalink structure in WordPress to resemble that one in Blogger as much as possible:

Setting up permalinks

  1. Go to Settings -> Permalinks
  2. Choose “Month and Name” option
  3. Scroll down and click “Save changes” button

7. Redirect the old content to the new one

Here comes a very important part. If you have been running your Blogger blog for awhile, you must have had some impact on search engines. We also believe that you have been sharing new posts via social media, and have acquired some regular visits to the site. The worst thing that can happen if you move your blog is to neglect the old site and visitors that are still stopping by to the old address.

Blogger is Google’s child, so links to your Blogger blog are important for the SEO (search engine optimization). Even if you stop posting on the platform, the old links will still matter Google and other search engines.

Instead of losing all those visitors that decide to stop by the old blog, you should redirect them to the new self-hosted WordPress site you have just set up.

In order to make this work, you will need to set up the redirections both on your Blogger and WordPress site.

7.1. Redirect from Blogger

Themes

  1. Log in to your Blogger account
  2. Navigate to Themes
  3. Scroll all the way down and click on “Revert to classic themes”

Blogger will warn you about losing some of the features by reverting to classic themes. Since you are moving to self-hosted WordPress, you should not worry about this. By reverting, you will enable the option that will allow you to make the redirection possible.

As soon as you confirm that you want to revert to classic themes, Blogger will show you a new settings page. On the page, scroll down to “Edit Theme HTML” section where you get to see the code that powers up your current Blogger themes.

  • Select the entire code in the Edit Theme HTML
  • Delete the code that you have selected
  • Copy and paste the following:
    
    <html>
    <head>
    <title><$BlogPageTitle$></title>
    
    
    <script>
    <MainOrArchivePage>
    window.location.href="http://example.com/";
    </MainOrArchivePage>
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    window.location.href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </script>
    
    
    <MainPage>
    <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/" />
    </MainPage>
    
    
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"
    />
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </head>
    
    
    <body>
    <MainOrArchivePage>
    <h1><a href="http://example.com/"><$BlogTitle$></a></h1>
    </MainOrArchivePage>
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    <h1><a
    href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"><$BlogItemTitle$></a></h1>
    <$BlogItemBody$>
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </body>
    </html>
    
    
  • Go through the code, and replace “http://example.com/” with the URL of your new domain. Check this twice because even the slightest typo will render the redirection useless
  • Click “Save theme” button.

If you already know how to install and use WordPress plugins, there is a nice plugin called Blogger to WordPress that will help you with this redirection part. If you install the plugin, it will help you generate the exact same code we showed you above and it will use your URL automatically so you don’t have to worry about messing up:

  • Install and activate the plugin
  • Go to Tools -> Blogger to WordPress Redirection
  • Click on Start Configuration button to generate code for your Blogger blog
  • You should see the name of your Blogger blog if you have imported it correctly
  • Click on “Get Code” button
  • Log in to your Blogger account
  • Navigate to Themes
  • Scroll all the way down and click on “Revert to classic themes”
  • Select the entire code in the Edit Theme HTML and delete it
  • Paste the code you have copied from the plugin

7.2. Redirect to your new WordPress blog

  • Paste the code you have copied from the plugin
  • Log in to your WordPress site
  • Navigate to Appearance -> Editor which will open the theme editor
  • On the right side menu, find “Theme Function” (functions.php file) which is usually on top of the list
  • Click on the file to start editing it. The code will load into the main window
  • Copy and paste the following code on the bottom of the file:
    function blogger_query_vars_filter($vars) {
    $vars[] = "blogger";
    return $vars;
    }
    
    add_filter('query_vars', 'blogger_query_vars_filter');
    
    function blogger_template_redirect() {
    global $wp_query;
    $blogger = $wp_query - > query_vars['blogger'];
    if (isset($blogger)) {
    wp_redirect(get_wordpress_url($blogger), 301);
    exit;
    }
    
    }
    add_action('template_redirect', 'blogger_template_redirect');
    
    function get_wordpress_url($blogger) {
    if (preg_match('@^(?:https?://)?([^/]+)(.*)@i', $blogger, $url_parts)) {
    $query = new WP_Query(
    array("meta_key" = > "blogger_permalink", "meta_value" = > $url_parts[2]
    ) )
    ;
    if ($query - > have_posts()) {
    $query - > the_post();
    $url = get_permalink();
    }
    wp_reset_postdata();
    }
    return $url ? $url : home_url();
    }
    
    
  • Click “Update file” button on the bottom of the page

You do not need to change anything in this code. As soon as you click the “Update file” button, your current theme will get instructed to redirect users from Blogger to the exact post you previously imported into your new WordPress site.

Important note: If you decide to change the WordPress theme, you will have to repeat this step and copy the code to a Theme Functions file of the new theme.

7.3 Redirect Feeds

Unfortunately, we are still not done with the redirection part. We understand your pain; there are not many people in this world who love to go through time-consuming setups, but you will have to find that inner peace and focus for a few more minutes. Don’t forget that you are doing this to improve your blog.

If you have had RSS subscribers, they will not be able to tell that the migration happened. So, in order not to lose their trust, you will have to make another redirection and tell your Blogger blog that you have a new RSS feed.

Luckily, there’s no coding involved:

Other Settings

  • Go to your Blogger blog
  • Navigate to Settings -> Other
  • Find “Site Feed” section
  • Next to the “Post Feed Redirect URL”, click the “Add” link
  • Type in https://yoursite.com/feed/ and don’t forget to change the name of your site

Do not forget to save settings by clicking the button on the top-right corner of the page

This is it! The redirections are finally over and both the posts and RSS feed are linking back to your self-hosted WordPress site.

It’s time for testing

Side Image

If you have followed the steps, you have also successfully migrated your blog from Blogger to WordPress. Congratulations! Just to make sure that everything went smoothly, we suggest that you do some tests.

Go to any of your old Blogger posts and try to reload them. If everything was ok, you should now be redirected to the corresponding WordPress post! You can repeat the test and try opening a few more posts to make sure there are no problems. If you are not being redirected automatically, go back to the Redirect section and make sure you did everything correctly:

  • Check if you have copied the entire code
  • Check if you replaced the URL of your site in all the places and if you have you edited the right functions.php file.
  • If you are using an RSS reader, you can also test the RSS feed for redirections by clicking on the link to one of your posts. It should now lead to the WordPress site.

What about my images?

Side Image

Usually, WordPress will automatically import the images to the WordPress Media Library. If you had images in a post, it will automatically appear in the same post on your new WordPress site. But don’t take it for granted. Sometimes, the Importer might miss importing some of your images, or the imported images might not be linked correctly.

If that is the case with your new blog, you can still resolve the issue quite quickly.

Before you start to panic, check your Media Library Media Library:

  1. Go to Media -> Library
  2. Check if your old images are visible here
  3. If the images are there, check if their link to the host instead of blogger.com. Click on the image and check the URL field to see if it’s pointing back to Blogger or your new domain

Missing images

If the Importer missed uploading images, you can still quickly get them on your new WordPress blog. You will have to install a plugin that will take care of that.

We don’t usually recommend outdated plugins, but this one is still great for the job.

  1. Go to Plugins -> Add New
  2. Search for “Import external attachments”
  3. Install and activate the plugin
  4. Go to Media -> Import attachments

If there are any images that the Importer hasn’t imported yet, the plugin will link them on the page. All you have to do here is to click “Import attachments now” button. The plugin can import 50 images at the time, so allow some time until all the images get added to the library.

Wrong image URLs

Sometimes, users might have their images imported to the Media Library without problems. But, in order for the images to show correctly, they have to point to the right address. In some cases, although the images are on your new host, your post and pages might still try to load the old ones (that are found on your old Blogger blog).
Velvet Blues Updated Urls

  • Go to Plugins -> Add New
  • Search for “Velvet Blues Update URLs
  • Install and activate the plugin
  • Go to Tools-> Update URLs to configure plugin’s settings

On the settings page, you should enter your old URL (for example https://yourblog.blogspot.com/) and the new URL (for example https://yournewsite.com/). You can leave the rest of the settings checked by default. Double check the URLs and other settings, and click “Update URLs now” button.

The plugin will then search for all instances of your old URL and switch them to the new one. You will be done in a minute, and all the URLs will be updated to the right one.

What to do next?

Side Image

Your blog has finally been completely moved from Blogger to WordPress. Hopefully, you have checked it and everything works fine from the first take. If not, we suggest going through the steps one more time to see if you missed something. The whole migration process is not very demanding, but it definitely takes time and patience to complete.

If everything went smoothly for you, here’s what you could do next:

  • Keep your old blog on Blogger live. Don’t delete it as the redirection won’t work
  • Check the imported posts for errors. Sometimes, formatting of a post might get messed up so you will have to remove unnecessary spaces or broken links
  • Start exploring WordPress and learn more about it
  • Search for a WordPress theme that will represent your blog. Don’t forget to edit the Theme Functions file if you change the theme
  • Check some of the best plugins you can install
How To Link My Blogspot Site To WordPress Blog

How To Link My Blogspot Site To WordPress Blog

What should & will be transferred?

Before we start, it would be nice to know a few details.

In a perfect world, you would go to one blog, click a button to export it, and it would magically appear on your self-hosted website. While it is still not possible, we at First Site Guide offer a substitution for the magic. Let us move your Blogger site to a self-hosted WordPress.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to transfer the entire site as it looks on Blogger. The style of your blog (theme, extensions, fonts, colors, widgets, etc.) will have to be added separately. You can only transfer the data:

  • Posts & Pages
  • Comments
  • Categories
  • Media
  • Permalinks
  • Feed
  • Authors
  • Traffic

Let’s start the transfer

Side Image

Alright, we are all set to go. While it definitely takes some time to perform each step correctly, moving your blog from Blogger to WordPress is not that hard even if you’re a complete beginner. Do not rush and do not skip steps.

1. Choose the best WordPress hosting

Since you are moving to a self-hosted WordPress, the first step would be finding a WordPress hosting company that will take care of your files. You will need to install WordPress on that host, and you will have to trust the company. You are starting a serious blog now, so you should not take this for granted.

There are dozens of hosting companies that are providing WordPress hosting services. Also, there are hundreds (if not more) websites that compare them. But before you hit the search button on Google or other search engines of your choice to start reading all the reviews, we should warn you that many sites & reviews are paid for. So, you will end up reading fake reviews and bogus opinions on a hosting company that paid to get listed as the best one.

To help you with that, we have thoroughly tested hosting companies and found the best one. If you want to start your self-hosted WordPress journey the right way, host your site with Abollyhost – the perfect solution for your new blog.

If this is your first time registering for a hosting account, we strongly suggest going through our detailed tutorial on how to start a blog which will show you how to open a Abollyhost account step by step.

2. Install WordPress

Congratulations! You have joined a family of millions of happy bloggers who trust their sites to Abollyhost. You will soon realize it was a clever choice. Now that your account is ready, you can move on and install WordPress.

Did we mention that Abollyhost loves WordPress users? Because of that, you get to install WordPress in just a few clicks of the mouse button:

  1. Log in to your Abollyhost cPanel account
  2. Please go to the Website section
  3. Select Install WordPress
  4. Click the Install button
  5. Choose the domain name to install it to (in the field next to it, you can enter a subfolder such as ‘blog’ or leave it blank if you want the site’s main page to be the blog)
  6. Now click “advanced options” if you want to change the email address, username, and password for the new WordPress installation
  7. Read through the license and service agreements and check the boxes if you agree with everything (you have to agree in order to continue)
  8. Click the Install Now button

This is definitely the easiest way of installing WordPress. If you’re just trying to move the blog as soon as possible, we recommend that option.

3. Export your blog from Blogger

This is it. It is finally time to export the data from your (let’s call it old) blog that you have started on Blogger. You will need to take all the data from it and store into a file. Don’t worry; you won’t have to create files manually or copy the data. There is actually a button you will need to click and everything will be done in a jiffy:

Overview Stats

  1. Log in to your Blogger account
  2. Go to Settings -> Other which will open the settings page
  3. On top of the page, find “Import & back up” section
  4. Find and click the “Back up Content” button
  5. A pop-up window will appear. Click “Save on your computer” button.

After clicking the button, Blogger will start downloading the XML file that contains all the important data from your blog. Depending on how much content you have, the file may be smaller or larger. You will end up having a file named blog with the date of export. For example: “blog-05-06-2018.xml”.

Locate the file (you can copy it to your desktop so you can find it more easily) and you are officially done with the export. This part wasn’t that scary, right?

4. Import the data to WordPress

If you haven’t skipped steps of this guide, you already have a hosting account and a WordPress site ready to be set up. Let’s import the data from Blogger to WordPress:

Dashboard

  1. Log in to your WordPress website
  2. Go to Tools -> Import
  3. Find Blogger on the list (it should be the first option, on top of the list)
  4. Click “Install now” link and wait for a few seconds for WordPress to finish installing the plugin

After the installation is complete, WordPress will show you a notification if the tool was installed successfully. The same notification will have the link to run the importer. Alternatively, you can click the link to Run Importer from the same spot where you found the install link.

Import

  1. Click “Run Importer” link
  2. On the new page, click “Choose File” button
  3. Search for the XML file you downloaded in the previous step (desktop or any other folder where you left it)
  4. If necessary (depending on the size of the file, your internet connection speed, and your host) wait for a few seconds until the file loads
  5. Click on “Upload file and import” button when possible

Again, depending on the various aspects, this might take a few seconds, so please be patient. When the import is complete, WordPress will show you a new page where you will need to assign the author to the imported posts. Let us show you how to do that in the next step.

4.1. Help, the file is too big to upload!

Usually, WordPress puts a limitation on the maximum file size you can upload. The limit might differ, but you can always manually increase if it necessary. If your exported file was simply too large, you will need to change the maximum upload size for WordPress. If you want to check your current upload limit, please go to Media -> Add New and find the information on the bottom of the screen.

Alright, let’s change that limit so you can import the blog without problems:

  1. Login to your Abollyhost Control Panel
  2. Open the File Manager
  3. Chose to go to the Web Root and click Go
  4. Scroll in the right-hand panel and find file php.ini -> right-click it
  5. Select Code Edit in the pop-up menu
  6. Click Edit at the bottom of the pop-up
  7. Use the keyboard shortcut to open the find pop-up window
  8. Windows and Linux: Ctrl + f
  9. Mac: Command (⌘) + f
  10. Type upload_max_filesize in the search field and hit enter
  11. This will highlight upload_max_filesize = 50M. Change 50M to the size you need. For example 128M
  12. Open the find pop-up, again and in the Search text field type post_max_size and press enter
  13. Highlighted will be post_max_size = 50M. This will need to be changed to the same number as what was put in for upload_max_filesize

Click Save changes

5. Assign an author

If you have had a lot of posts on your Blogger blog, it might be difficult to recognize them without changing authors. That’s especially true if you are importing the blog to a WordPress site that was already running. To help you with that, WordPress lets you reassign the author of the imported item to an existing user of the site.

WordPress will show a list of existing authors you can assign the content to.

If it’s a new site, you will probably have just one user that you created during the installation of the content management system. So, you can select the name for the list, and the content that you are importing will be automatically assigned to that user.

Import

But if you would like to separate the content from the new one that you are going to add, later on, you can also create a new user directly from this page. In that case, you can write the name of a new user. Its user role will be set to subscriber and password will be randomly generated. You can change the user details later on.

After deciding whom to assign the content to, click the “Submit” button and you are all done.

6. Setting up permalinks

The content is successfully imported, and you are one more step closer to having your entire Blogger blog added to your new self-hosted WordPress site. Permalinks are URLs that WordPress uses when organizing posts & pages.
Each post, page, media file, etc. have to have a unique permalink (the address) to work properly. Permalinks might have a huge impact on your site and SEO. And while you can set them up as you wish when starting a new website, we would suggest a different approach when importing a site from Blogger.

Blogger uses month & name to distinguish permalinks. So, if you go to any of your Blogger posts, you will see that it looks something like this: https://demoblog.blogspot. com/2018/05/this-is-post-title.html

In order to keep things in order, we suggest changing the permalink structure in WordPress to resemble that one in Blogger as much as possible:

Setting up permalinks

  1. Go to Settings -> Permalinks
  2. Choose “Month and Name” option
  3. Scroll down and click “Save changes” button

7. Redirect the old content to the new one

Here comes a very important part. If you have been running your Blogger blog for awhile, you must have had some impact on search engines. We also believe that you have been sharing new posts via social media, and have acquired some regular visits to the site. The worst thing that can happen if you move your blog is to neglect the old site and visitors that are still stopping by to the old address.

Blogger is Google’s child, so links to your Blogger blog are important for the SEO (search engine optimization). Even if you stop posting on the platform, the old links will still matter Google and other search engines.

Instead of losing all those visitors that decide to stop by the old blog, you should redirect them to the new self-hosted WordPress site you have just set up.

In order to make this work, you will need to set up the redirections both on your Blogger and WordPress site.

7.1. Redirect from Blogger

Themes

  1. Log in to your Blogger account
  2. Navigate to Themes
  3. Scroll all the way down and click on “Revert to classic themes”

Blogger will warn you about losing some of the features by reverting to classic themes. Since you are moving to self-hosted WordPress, you should not worry about this. By reverting, you will enable the option that will allow you to make the redirection possible.

As soon as you confirm that you want to revert to classic themes, Blogger will show you a new settings page. On the page, scroll down to “Edit Theme HTML” section where you get to see the code that powers up your current Blogger themes.

  • Select the entire code in the Edit Theme HTML
  • Delete the code that you have selected
  • Copy and paste the following:
    
    <html>
    <head>
    <title><$BlogPageTitle$></title>
    
    
    <script>
    <MainOrArchivePage>
    window.location.href="http://example.com/";
    </MainOrArchivePage>
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    window.location.href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </script>
    
    
    <MainPage>
    <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/" />
    </MainPage>
    
    
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"
    />
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </head>
    
    
    <body>
    <MainOrArchivePage>
    <h1><a href="http://example.com/"><$BlogTitle$></a></h1>
    </MainOrArchivePage>
    <Blogger>
    <ItemPage>
    <h1><a
    href="http://example.com/?blogger=<$BlogItemPermalinkURL$>"><$BlogItemTitle$></a></h1>
    <$BlogItemBody$>
    </ItemPage>
    </Blogger>
    </body>
    </html>
    
    
  • Go through the code, and replace “http://example.com/” with the URL of your new domain. Check this twice because even the slightest typo will render the redirection useless
  • Click “Save theme” button.

If you already know how to install and use WordPress plugins, there is a nice plugin called Blogger to WordPress that will help you with this redirection part. If you install the plugin, it will help you generate the exact same code we showed you above and it will use your URL automatically so you don’t have to worry about messing up:

  • Install and activate the plugin
  • Go to Tools -> Blogger to WordPress Redirection
  • Click on Start Configuration button to generate code for your Blogger blog
  • You should see the name of your Blogger blog if you have imported it correctly
  • Click on “Get Code” button
  • Log in to your Blogger account
  • Navigate to Themes
  • Scroll all the way down and click on “Revert to classic themes”
  • Select the entire code in the Edit Theme HTML and delete it
  • Paste the code you have copied from the plugin

7.2. Redirect to your new WordPress blog

  • Paste the code you have copied from the plugin
  • Log in to your WordPress site
  • Navigate to Appearance -> Editor which will open the theme editor
  • On the right side menu, find “Theme Function” (functions.php file) which is usually on top of the list
  • Click on the file to start editing it. The code will load into the main window
  • Copy and paste the following code on the bottom of the file:
    function blogger_query_vars_filter($vars) {
    $vars[] = "blogger";
    return $vars;
    }
    
    add_filter('query_vars', 'blogger_query_vars_filter');
    
    function blogger_template_redirect() {
    global $wp_query;
    $blogger = $wp_query - > query_vars['blogger'];
    if (isset($blogger)) {
    wp_redirect(get_wordpress_url($blogger), 301);
    exit;
    }
    
    }
    add_action('template_redirect', 'blogger_template_redirect');
    
    function get_wordpress_url($blogger) {
    if (preg_match('@^(?:https?://)?([^/]+)(.*)@i', $blogger, $url_parts)) {
    $query = new WP_Query(
    array("meta_key" = > "blogger_permalink", "meta_value" = > $url_parts[2]
    ) )
    ;
    if ($query - > have_posts()) {
    $query - > the_post();
    $url = get_permalink();
    }
    wp_reset_postdata();
    }
    return $url ? $url : home_url();
    }
    
    
  • Click “Update file” button on the bottom of the page

You do not need to change anything in this code. As soon as you click the “Update file” button, your current theme will get instructed to redirect users from Blogger to the exact post you previously imported into your new WordPress site.

Important note: If you decide to change the WordPress theme, you will have to repeat this step and copy the code to a Theme Functions file of the new theme.

7.3 Redirect Feeds

Unfortunately, we are still not done with the redirection part. We understand your pain; there are not many people in this world who love to go through time-consuming setups, but you will have to find that inner peace and focus for a few more minutes. Don’t forget that you are doing this to improve your blog.

If you have had RSS subscribers, they will not be able to tell that the migration happened. So, in order not to lose their trust, you will have to make another redirection and tell your Blogger blog that you have a new RSS feed.

Luckily, there’s no coding involved:

Other Settings

  • Go to your Blogger blog
  • Navigate to Settings -> Other
  • Find “Site Feed” section
  • Next to the “Post Feed Redirect URL”, click the “Add” link
  • Type in https://yoursite.com/feed/ and don’t forget to change the name of your site

Do not forget to save settings by clicking the button on the top-right corner of the page

This is it! The redirections are finally over and both the posts and RSS feed are linking back to your self-hosted WordPress site.

It’s time for testing

Side Image

If you have followed the steps, you have also successfully migrated your blog from Blogger to WordPress. Congratulations! Just to make sure that everything went smoothly, we suggest that you do some tests.

Go to any of your old Blogger posts and try to reload them. If everything was ok, you should now be redirected to the corresponding WordPress post! You can repeat the test and try opening a few more posts to make sure there are no problems. If you are not being redirected automatically, go back to the Redirect section and make sure you did everything correctly:

  • Check if you have copied the entire code
  • Check if you replaced the URL of your site in all the places and if you have you edited the right functions.php file.
  • If you are using an RSS reader, you can also test the RSS feed for redirections by clicking on the link to one of your posts. It should now lead to the WordPress site.

What about my images?

Side Image

Usually, WordPress will automatically import the images to the WordPress Media Library. If you had images in a post, it will automatically appear in the same post on your new WordPress site. But don’t take it for granted. Sometimes, the Importer might miss importing some of your images, or the imported images might not be linked correctly.

If that is the case with your new blog, you can still resolve the issue quite quickly.

Before you start to panic, check your Media Library Media Library:

  1. Go to Media -> Library
  2. Check if your old images are visible here
  3. If the images are there, check if their link to the host instead of blogger.com. Click on the image and check the URL field to see if it’s pointing back to Blogger or your new domain

Missing images

If the Importer missed uploading images, you can still quickly get them on your new WordPress blog. You will have to install a plugin that will take care of that.

We don’t usually recommend outdated plugins, but this one is still great for the job.

  1. Go to Plugins -> Add New
  2. Search for “Import external attachments”
  3. Install and activate the plugin
  4. Go to Media -> Import attachments

If there are any images that the Importer hasn’t imported yet, the plugin will link them on the page. All you have to do here is to click “Import attachments now” button. The plugin can import 50 images at the time, so allow some time until all the images get added to the library.

Wrong image URLs

Sometimes, users might have their images imported to the Media Library without problems. But, in order for the images to show correctly, they have to point to the right address. In some cases, although the images are on your new host, your post and pages might still try to load the old ones (that are found on your old Blogger blog).
Velvet Blues Updated Urls

  • Go to Plugins -> Add New
  • Search for “Velvet Blues Update URLs
  • Install and activate the plugin
  • Go to Tools-> Update URLs to configure plugin’s settings

On the settings page, you should enter your old URL (for example https://yourblog.blogspot.com/) and the new URL (for example https://yournewsite.com/). You can leave the rest of the settings checked by default. Double check the URLs and other settings, and click “Update URLs now” button.

The plugin will then search for all instances of your old URL and switch them to the new one. You will be done in a minute, and all the URLs will be updated to the right one.

What to do next?

Side Image

Your blog has finally been completely moved from Blogger to WordPress. Hopefully, you have checked it and everything works fine from the first take. If not, we suggest going through the steps one more time to see if you missed something. The whole migration process is not very demanding, but it definitely takes time and patience to complete.

If everything went smoothly for you, here’s what you could do next:

  • Keep your old blog on Blogger live. Don’t delete it as the redirection won’t work
  • Check the imported posts for errors. Sometimes, formatting of a post might get messed up so you will have to remove unnecessary spaces or broken links
  • Start exploring WordPress and learn more about it
  • Search for a WordPress theme that will represent your blog. Don’t forget to edit the Theme Functions file if you change the theme
  • Check some of the best plugins you can install
How do I check the disk usage of my cPanel/Whm reseller account?

How do I check the disk usage of my cPanel/Whm reseller account?

Check disk space usage of all cPanel accounts

To check allotted disk space and current disk space usage for specific account, follow these steps.

  1. Log into WHM with your reseller account.
  2. Locate Account Information section and select List Accounts.List Accounts
  3. In next screen, you would see list of cPanel accounts along with allotted disk space quota and actual disk space usage columns.

Check disk space usage of entire reseller account

To check disk space usage of entire reseller account, follow these steps.

  1. Log into WHM with your reseller account.
  2. Locate Account Information section and select Create New Account.
  3. Scroll down to bottom of the page, under Account Creation Resource Information section, you will see the total disk space and bandwidth for the entire Reseller account.
How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

Sometimes, developers find it difficult to Enable or disable Apache Mod-Rewrite Module in cPanel. By default, this module always set to enable, but in some case it may had been disabled.

ALSO CHECK: How to force download media files on wordpress

You can follow the below steps to enable it back;
  1.  Login to your cPanel
  2. Click on file manager
  3.  Enable hidden files to show, from “Setting” at the top-right sidebar
  4. open your “public_html folder, or the other folder that contain your website contents
  5.  Locate & Edit your .htaccess file,
  6. Copy RewriteEngine On
    RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://yourdomain.com/$1 [R=301,L]
    to you htaccess file
  7. Depends on what you want to rewrite, but commonly, developers use this to force https to load
  8.  Change “yourdomain.com” from that code to your website domain link, and the Save it.

ALSO CHECK:  How to Install a free SSL certificate in cPanel using LetsEncrypt

How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

How can I enable Mod-Rewrite Module?

Sometimes, developers find it difficult to Enable or disable Apache Mod-Rewrite Module in cPanel. By default, this module always set to enable, but in some case it may had been disabled.

ALSO CHECK: How to force download media files on wordpress

You can follow the below steps to enable it back;
  1.  Login to your cPanel
  2. Click on file manager
  3.  Enable hidden files to show, from “Setting” at the top-right sidebar
  4. open your “public_html folder, or the other folder that contain your website contents
  5.  Locate & Edit your .htaccess file,
  6. Copy RewriteEngine On
    RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://yourdomain.com/$1 [R=301,L]
    to you htaccess file
  7. Depends on what you want to rewrite, but commonly, developers use this to force https to load
  8.  Change “yourdomain.com” from that code to your website domain link, and the Save it.

ALSO CHECK:  How to Install a free SSL certificate in cPanel using LetsEncrypt

How To Stop Receiving Spam Comments On Your WordPress Blog

How To Stop Receiving Spam Comments On Your WordPress Blog

Unfortunately, comment spam is a fact of life on the internet. If you enable comments on your website, you will have to deal with spammers. To prevent your site from making a poor first impression, you’ll need to find a way to stop comment spam in its tracks.

While you may never be able to eliminate spam entirely, you can do a lot to slow it down. For WordPress users, there are plenty of simple tweaks you can perform that will block or hide these comments before your visitors see them. You can even use a robust anti-spam plugin to tighten your defenses.

In this post, we’ll talk a little about what comment spam is and why it happens. Then we’ll show you six easy ways to stop comment spam on your WordPress site. Let’s take a look!

What comment spam is (and why it’s such a problem)

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />An example of spam comments in WordPress.

Spam comments are often easily recognized by their generic content.

If you permit comments on your site, you’re bound to get some comment spam. As your site grows more popular, that spam is likely to become an even larger issue. There are many types of comment spam these days, but most of it is automated, posted by spam bots that use short, generic messages as a cover for including links.

Whatever form it takes, comment spam is a real problem because:

  • When your comment sections are filled up with spam messages, it’s harder for legitimate visitors to have conversations.
  • Leaving spam comments on your content makes your site look unprofessional.
  • A lot of these comments include malicious links, designed to trick visitors into giving away personal information.

Clearly, it’s vital to do everything you can to stop comment spam from appearing on your WordPress site. Fortunately, this isn’t difficult to do once you know the right techniques.

How to stop comment spam on your WordPress website (5 simple solutions)

The following six solutions are all smart ways to stop comment spam on your website. You can try all of these methods, or pick and choose the ones that are most relevant to your needs.

1. Reduce the number of links allowed per post

As we mentioned earlier, most comment spam is designed to add links in your comment section and trick people into clicking on them. Therefore, one way to combat spam is to permit fewer links in your comments. Legitimate visitors will also be prevented from posting many links, but slowing down the spammers can be worth that potential inconvenience.

From your WordPress dashboard, you can navigate to Settings → Discussion to make this change. Look for the Comment Moderation section:

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Changing the number of links allowed per comment in WordPress.

Here you can decide how many links will be permitted in a comment before it is flagged for moderation. You can even reduce the number to zero if you want to require moderation for any comment with links.

2. Create a list of ‘blacklisted’ words

Many spam comments contain a lot of recognizable keywords. This makes it easier to spot them and to stop them from appearing on your website. You can simply create a ‘blacklist’ of words, and your site will flag any comment containing one of them.

To do this, return to Settings → Discussion in your WordPress dashboard and find the Comment Blacklist section:

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Creating a comment blacklist in WordPress is a good way to stop comment spam

Here, you can enter your list of words. When any comment is posted that contains one of those words, it will be sent straight to the trash. Of course, it’s important to choose the words in your blacklist carefully, so you don’t delete comments by legitimate posters. For suggestions, you can check out the recommended comment blacklist for WordPress on GitHub.

3. Restrict comment privileges to registered users

The goal of most spammers is to post on as many pages and sites as possible. This means if you can make it more challenging for them to add their comments to your site, they may just move on to the next target.

You can achieve this by restricting comment privileges to people who have registered on your site. This puts an extra hurdle between spammers and your comment section. As a side benefit, it encourages visitors to sign up for an account or a membership.

This option is also available in the Settings → Discussion section in WordPress. You’ll find it under Other comment settings:

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />The Other Comment Settings section in WordPress.

Simply check the box labeled Users must be registered and logged in to comment, and save your changes.

4. Set up a comment moderation system

In a nutshell, comment moderation is when you require some or all comments to be approved by a person before they are permitted to appear on your site. If you have the time and resources to spare, this can be a smart strategy.

In WordPress, you can enable a comment moderation system very easily. Simply go back to Settings → Discussion, and check out the Before a comment appears section:

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Setting up a comment moderation system in WordPress.

By selecting Comment must be manually approved, any comments made on your site will be held as Pending until they are reviewed. You can then check out each one, and decide whether to let it through or trash it. You can find more advice on setting up a comment moderation system in the WordPress Codex.

5. Use an anti-spam plugin

Finally, we would be remiss not to mention anti-spam plugins. These tools can present a powerful way to stop comment spam and can take care of sorting the good comments from the bad for you.

Many WordPress installations come with Akismet bundled in, and for good reason:

This anti-spam plugin connects to a constantly updated database of spam, so it’s very proficient at recognizing which comments are trouble and filtering them out. It also enables you to see what comments have been flagged.

Akismet is a solid option for most users, but there are plenty of excellent alternatives. For example, Antispam Bee is a well-reviewed plugin with a lot of customizable settings and features. Whatever plugin you choose, you’ll be taking an important step to stop comment spam on your website.

6. Move to a new comments system (like Disqus)

This method won’t work for all sites, but some third-party comment systems, like Disqus, can help eliminate most of the spam for you. Disqus is actually what we use here at ThemeIsle (you can scroll down and leave a comment on this post to see it in action!). Another option is to use Facebook comments on your site.

If you’re interested either of these options, check out our post on WordPress comment plugins.

Conclusion

Spam comments can quickly clutter up your site, making it look unprofessional and driving real visitors away. Cleaning up all that spam after the fact is challenging. This means you should strongly consider putting a little upfront time into developing a strong anti-spam strategy.

To stop comment spam on your WordPress site, you can:

  1. Reduce the number of links allowed per post
  2. Create a list of ‘blacklisted’ words
  3. Set up a comment moderation system
  4. Restrict comment privileges to registered users
  5. Use an anti-spam plugin, such as Akismet.
  6. Move to a third-party comments plugin