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How to migrate an account from another web hosting provider to our server

This article describes how to migrate data from another web hosting provider to your Abollyhost account. When you migrate from another hosting provider, we recommend that you leave plenty of overlap time (no less than 7 days) between opening your AbollyHost account and closing your previous account. Doing so helps ensure that your web site’s downtime is minimal during migration.

If your web hosting provider supports cPanel, we can manage the migration to AbollyHost for you. If your web hosting provider does not support cPanel, however, We will migrate one website and database manually at no charge.

 

If your current web hosting provider uses cPanel, we can migrate your existing site for you by doing an account transfer. Account transfers are available for the following types of accounts:

  • Shared hosting accounts.
  • Managed VPS accounts.
  • Managed Flex Dedicated Server accounts.

 

  • We cannot guarantee account transfers. We do transfers on a best-effort basis.

  • You can transfer your previous hosting account free of charge within 30 days of establishing your AbollyHost account. Please allow up to 72 hours for us to complete the account transfer.

  • Please do not cancel your old hosting account until you have changed your DNS settings and thoroughly tested your new AbollyHost account to make sure the migration was successful.

  • If you are a reseller, account transfers are as follows:

    • If you purchase a reseller plan for one year or more, we will transfer 100% of the cPanel accounts for free.

    • If you purchase a reseller plan for less than one year, we will transfer 50% of the cPanel accounts for free. We can transfer additional cPanel accounts for an extra fee (currently N1,000 NGN per account).

 

 

To transfer your account, follow these steps:

  1. If you have not already done so, sign up for your AbollyHost account.

We recommend you provide an e-mail address that does not belong to the domain that you want to migrate. This minimizes the possibility of messages getting lost during the migration.

 

2. Log in to the Customer Portal.

3. Open a support tickets with heading “Hosting Migration”

4. Complete the requested information in the form, and then click Submit Ticket.

Please let us know if your databases contain views, functions, or stored procedures. The cPanel migration procedure does not migrate these items, so we must migrate them manually.

5.   We will notify you when the account transfer is complete.

6.   Test your web site on the AbollyHost server before you change the domain’s name server settings. To do this, you can use the shared URL for your account provided in the A2 Hosting Customer Portal at https://Abollyhost.com, or you can use a custom hosts file.

7.  Change your domain’s name server settings to use AbollyHost name servers.

8.  Wait 48 hours for DNS propagation to complete.

9.  After you verify that the web site on the AbollyHost server is accessible and working correctly, you can cancel your account with the other hosting provider.

 

 

 

MANUAL MIGRATION

If your current hosting provider does not support cPanel, you can migrate your data manually. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. If you have not already done so, sign up for your AbollyHost account.
    When you sign up with AbollyHost, we recommend you provide an e-mail address that does not belong to the domain that you want to migrate. This minimizes the possibility of messages getting lost during the migration.
  2. Migrate your files, e-mail accounts, and databases to your AbollyHost account:
    • Your web site files should go in the public_html directory of your AbollyHost account.
  3. Test your web site on the AbollyHost server before you change the domain’s name server settings. To do this, you can use the shared URL for your account provided in the A2 Hosting Customer Portal at your account dashboard, or you can use a custom hosts file.
  4. Change your domain’s name server settings to use AbollyHost name servers.
  5. Wait 48 hours for DNS propagation to complete.
  6. After you verify that the web site on the AbollyHost server is accessible and working correctly, you can cancel your account with the other hosting provider.

Hope you get this tutoriaal in a simple way, if you encourter any error please drop a comment or contact us on support@abollyhost.com

First Steps With WordPress After Finishing The Installaion

First Steps With WordPress After Finishing The Installaion

Now What?

You’ve just completed the 5 Minute Installation of WordPress or one-click install from your web host. Now what?

Let’s take a step-by-step tour through your WordPress site and see how the different functions work and how to make your new site your own. During the first part of this tutorial, please don’t change anything within the program unless it is part of the tutorial. After following these steps, you’ll soon be changing everything.

BEFORE YOU START MAKE SURE YOU HAVE INSTALL SSL CERTIFICATES ON YOUR DOMAIN FROM CPANEL

Log In

View Log In Form

Begin by logging into the “administration area” or the back end of your website. Visit your site’s login page by placing “wp-admin” after your domain name (e.g. http://example.com/wp-admin). You can also place “login” after your domain as of WordPress 3.4. Some themes provide a “login” link or form on the front end as well. Now log into WordPress using your username and password.

ALSO CHECK: Introduction to Blogging what you should know before get started

Start at the Top

View Site Link

After logging in you are on the main Administration Screen called the Dashboard. This is the brain behind your website, the place where you can let your creativity explode, writing brilliant prose and designing the best and most lovely website possible. This is where the organization of your site begins – and this is just the start.

At the top of the screen is the area called the “toolbar.” Click on the link that is your site name. This will take you to a view of your new WordPress site. Like it? Don’t like it? Doesn’t matter, just look at it. This is where you are going to be spending a lot of time!

Test Drive Your WordPress Site

twentytwelvedefault1.png

Take time to look at the site before you get into the changing of things and figuring out how all of this works; it’s important to see how the WordPress Twenty Seventeen theme is laid out and how it works. Consider this the test drive before you start adding on all the special features.

The layout you are looking at is called a WordPress Theme. It is the appearance of your website, styling the look of the site and the framing of the content. The WordPress Twenty Seventeen theme features a “header” at the top with the title and tagline for your site. Below this is your Menu. Along the side you will see some titles and links. This comprises Widgets. Within the main middle section of the page is the content area. At the bottom of the page is the footer.

Let’s look at the post for a moment. There is a “title,” and below the title is the date the post was written, then the body of the post, and finally some information about the post. This is called the post meta data and contains information about the post such as the category assigned to that post.

Scroll down the page and notice the bar at the end of the page. This is called the “footer.” It says “Proudly powered by WordPress.”

Back to the sidebar, you will see different sections with information. Among these you may find a list of Recent Posts, Recent Comments, Archives, Categories, and links to the Administration Screens, Log Out, and RSS feeds. This is part of the menu or navigation Screen that people will use to move around your site, visiting posts from different categories or time periods.

It’s All in the Details

Take time to notice the smaller details of this web page layout and design. Move your mouse over the title of the article post. Notice how it changes color. This is called a hover. Most Themes feature a distinctive color or underline when you move your mouse over a link. Move your mouse over any of the links in the sidebar. Do they change? Is the change the same? You can change your link hovers to look different in different sections of your page. Also look at the color of the links. How are they colored or underlined to stand out from the rest of the text?

Observe the small design details and where they are placed within the page. In the near future, you may want to change some of these details, such as the color of the title in the white box at the top of the page. If you remember that it is called the header, then you will know to look within the header section of your style sheet (the file that controls the look of your web page), when you want to make changes to it.

ALSO CHEK THIS: WordPress Guide: How to manage widget Management in wordpress

Take a Quick Trip Around

For now you only have one post. It is residing within a page that is laid out as your home page or the front page. If you click on the title of the post, it will take you to the specific page for that post. The first page or home page of your site features the most recent posts on your site. Each post title will link to the actual page of the post. Some Theme designers design their single post pages to look different from the home page. By clicking on the title, you are taken to another web page that looks different from the home page.

Again, in the single post, pay attention to the layout and notice what is now different about the design elements. Is the header different? Smaller, larger, or a different color? Is there a sidebar?

Posts are usually stored in Categories and/or Tags so you can keep related topics together. Right now you only have one category, but will soon want more. Click on the single category that appears in the sidebar of the home page. You are now in a page that has been generated to display only the posts within that category. Again, take a look at the layout and see how it may be different from the home page and the single post.

Do the same with the Archives. You may only have one post, but look at how the page is laid out.

All of these changes are created from only a few files called template files and you can learn more about how they work in Stepping Into Templates. For now, however, let’s get on with how the rest of WordPress works.

Test Drive the WordPress Administration Screens

WordPress Admin Dashboard

Now that you have an idea of how your site looks and what the different layout sections are called, it’s time to test drive the WordPress Administration. This is like familiarizing yourself with the backend of your new website. In fact, the first page you see after logging in is called the Dashboard, a collection of information and data about the activities and actions on your WordPress site.

The Dashboard helps to keep you up to date on new and interesting bits of information from the many WordPress resources. In the corner, it also features a list of the most recent activity you’ve accomplished on your site.

On the left side of the screen is the main navigation menu detailing each of the administrative functions you can perform. Move your mouse down the list and the sub-menus will “fly out” for you to move your mouse to and click. Once you choose a “parent” navigation section, it will open up to reveal the options within that section.

The various menu items are as follows:

  • Dashboard
  • Posts
  • Media
  • Links
  • Pages
  • Comments
  • Appearance
  • Plugins
  • Users
  • Tools
  • Settings

The links in the above list will take you to a series of articles that will guide you step-by-step through every aspect of the Admin Screens. You are anxious to get started, so for now, let’s start with the Users Screen.

User Profile Screen

Click on the Users tab. The screen will change and you will see the Screen called All Users that shows a list of all your users; from here you can add or change existing users and authors accounts. In the navigation menu, click on the Your Profile menu choice. This is where you will enter information about you, the author and administrator of the site. Fill in the information and click Update Profile when done.

Now, let’s look at some other powerful features of the WordPress Admin.

Quick Changing the Look

The Appearance Screen

The Appearance, Themes Screen allows you to change the look of your site using different Themes. Themes are presentation styles that completely change the look of your site. Designed by WordPress developers and users, there are hundreds of themes available for you to choose from. In your Appearance Screen, you will see a list of currently installed themes, including the WordPress Twenty Seventeen theme. To quickly change the theme, simply click on the Activate button under one of the themes listed, then click on your site name in the top toolbar to see how it looks. Wow, you have another look and nothing else on the site has changed. It’s that easy.

Go back to the Appearance > Theme Screen and click the Activate button under the WordPress Twenty Seventeen theme to bring the design back to what you had. To see it again, click your site name in the toolbar, and there it is.

Writing and Managing Posts

Add New Post Screen

Back at the Administration Screen, take a look at the Posts Screen. You can use the tabs under the Posts Menu to write and manage your posts. Let’s start by making your first test post in the Add New tab.

If the screen looks a little intimidating, the Codex article on Writing a Post will take you step-by-step through the process of writing a post. Take a moment to read through the article and post your first entry and then return to this article and we’ll take you onto the next step.

If you are in a hurry, then simply fill in the blanks, one by one, in the post beginning with the title and then write a little test message in the post window. This is just for a test, so you can write anything you want. When you are done, click the Publish button that is to the right of the post entry window and it is done. You will then see a blank Write a Post screen and you’re ready to write another post. Go ahead. But do only three to four entries. There’s more exciting work ahead!

Now that you’ve gotten a feel for writing posts, you can view your posts by clicking your site name in the toolbar on top of the screen. Now it’s time to get down to the real work.

Planning Session

If you want to create a good and solid website, you need a good and solid plan. I know it’s hard to do, and I know you want to keep playing with your new website, but it’s time to take a break away from your computer and turn to pen and paper.

On a piece of paper, describe your site. Take five to twenty minutes to come up with a purpose for your site, or better yet, call it your Mission Statement.

Answer the following questions:

  1. What am I going to do with this?
  2. Who is going to read this?
  3. What kinds of information will I be posting?
  4. Why am I doing this?
  5. Who am I doing this for?
  6. How often am I going to be posting and adding information?

Now, compile this information into a paragraph so it looks like this:

This website will be dedicated to X, Y, and Z,

and cover the topics of A, B, and C. The audience will

be __________ ________________ _______. I will be adding

posts every _____________ about ________ _______ ______________.

I am doing this because _____________ _____________ __________________.

Using the Information

From this exercise, we’ve gathered a lot of information. We’ve uncovered information on how you might layout and design your site. If you know your audience is mostly made up of young people under the age of 25, you will probably want a fashionable look ranging from wild colors and crazy graphics to dark foreboding tones. If you are providing factual information about a serious subject, then you will probably want a more conservative look where the information is more important than a lot of pop and flash.

You may already have a design idea in mind, or perhaps you will be copying over from your previous site, but take a moment to use this information to reconsider your design, and to see how what you want will work with the WordPress options.

You have also uncovered the possible categories for your site. The topics and subjects you will be covering are listed in your purpose statement. Let’s say your purpose statement said,

“The website will be dedicated to providing news and information on computers, web pages, and the internet and cover the topics of computer tips, web page design, and internet news.”

Your topics are your categories. Write your categories down below your purpose paragraph and notes about your web page design.

Now, what subcategories might be under these topics? Under Computer Tips, you might want to segregate them by WindowsLinux, and Mac. Or maybe Software and Hardware. You can have sub-sub-categories, but let’s stop with subcategories for right now. Write these down.

Remember the question about why you are doing this? Is it because you have valuable and timely information or knowledge to share, because you want to talk about a subject that interests you, or maybe because you just think it will be fun to do.

Understanding the timeliness of the information you want to present on your site helps you organize the information on your website. Your website is organized by several different methods. If the date of when you posted the information is critical to the success of the page, then having links to your posts referenced by date is important. If the information itself is more important and timeless, then having your posts referenced by category is the best choice.

Have you noticed that you are starting to lay out your website? If you remember our earlier test drive of your new WordPress website, we examined the sidebar menu. This is the area where your past posts are organized. If you take another look, you will see the sidebar is laid out in a list, including Archives by date and Categories by category. It may even feature a calendar.

As you lay out your website on paper, consider whether you want both categories and dates, or just one of them in your sidebar. What information you have and how you want to help the user find the information is critical to your website design.

What Information Do You Want to Share

As you think about what information the user will need to know, you have to consider what information you are willing to share with them. That information may include how to contact you, what the purpose of the site is, who you are, and what your expertise is.

A WordPress feature called Pages makes the process of presenting this information easier. Pages, similar to posts, are most commonly used to present unchanging information such as About UsContact UsSign Up for Our Mailing List, and other staticinformation. Before creating your individual Pages, you need to think about what information you would like the Page to hold. Write down the possible Page titles and describe the information you want to share on each Page.

Comments

Part of the fun of WordPress is the ability to have viewers leave comments on your site. It creates a dynamic interchange between you and the viewer. Do you want comments on your posts? Comments on posts come in a variety of forms, from pats on the back (Good job! Like the post!) to extensive conversations and commentary about the posts. Or maybe you are seeking comments that add to the information you’ve posted.

Responding to comments and moderating them can also take up a lot of time. If they are critical to your site, then include them and consider how you want them presented. Go back to your test site; the first post created at the time of installation included a sample comment. You can even make a few comments yourself on the posts you created. Take a look at how they are laid out and consider how you might want them to look to fit into the design and layout of your site.

When you have reached your decision about how you want to handle comments, take time to read through the article on comments and WordPress discussion options to help you set those features.

With this basic information, you are ready to return to your computer and start setting up your site.

Setting Up Your Site

Before you get to the graphic look of your site, let’s do a little more administration to your site to set it up. Consider making your first plugin installation the Enhanced Admin Bar with Codex Search. It allows you to search both the WordPress Codex and WordPress Support Forum from your WordPress Administration Screens. Click on one of the search results and the page will open in a new window or tab so you can have the article or discussion open while working on WordPress. This will make your transition to WordPress a much gentler one with information right at your fingertips. You can also work from this page by clicking on a link with a Right Click and opening the documents in a new window or tab, so you can read along as you work on your site.

You may also want to install plugins such as Jetpack by WordPress.com to supercharge your website, and don’t forget to activate the Akismet WordPress Plugin that is available with all WordPress sites to help protect it from comment spam.

But now, let’s start with making those categories you wrote down before.

Create Categories

In the Posts > Categories tab, in the Add New Category area, fill in the information about your category. Continue to add your parentcategories, going down the list. Hold off on entering subcategories until all the main categories are entered.

NOTE: You can add any new categories at any time, but make a note of the fact that categories can be sorted in WordPress in two ways: by name (alphabetically) or by ID number. As you enter the categories, they are assigned an ID number. It is difficult to change this, so if you don’t want your categories sorted alphabetically, enter them in the order you want to see them presented on the screen.

WordPress Admin Categories

When you have the parent categories entered, enter your subcategories. In the pull down menu for Parent Category, you can select the parent to the subcategory you are adding. When you view your categories in the Manage > Categories Screen, you will see the categories listed like this:

Computer Tips

– Windows
– Linux
– Mac

Internet News
Web Page Design

– Web Standards
– WordPress

– – Plugins
– – Themes

Put Posts into Categories

Let’s put some of your test posts into categories so you can see how this works.

WordPress Admin Posts

From the Posts > Category Screen, click on the tab for All Posts. You should see the test posts you entered here. When you hover your mouse over each post title, under the title, you should see the Edit | Quick Edit | Trash | Viewlinks. Click on Edit to edit one of the posts. On the right side of the Edit Post screen you will now see your Categories. Choose one of them by clicking in the box next to it. Then in the Publish module above, click the Update button. Repeat this for your other test posts, putting each one in a different category.

Now view your page by clicking on your site name in the toolbar at the top of your Administration Screen. Do you see the categories listed in the sidebar now? Great. If you are missing a category, that usually means that there are no posts in it. This is the default function of WordPress, so not to worry. When you add a post to the “missing” category, it will appear on your web pages. Click on one of the categories and you will be taken to a page for just that category. You should see the posts that went into that category. This is a generated Category page.

Now, click on the Archives for the month showing. Now you are visiting a generated page of your posts listed in chronological order for this month – well, specifically for today only. Two methods of finding the same information.

Preventing Spam

There is more to think about when it comes to having comments on your site. Unfortunately we live in a world where spam is a fact of life. It is recommended that you begin battling the comment spammers with the helpful article,.

What Is Next

You’ve now done all the basics for your new WordPress website. You know how to write a post, create a category, and how to view your site’s information by category and archive. You can start the customization process, and when you are done, don’t forget to delete your test posts! Then start writing some wonderful information to share with your new-found public!

Customizing Your WordPress Site

Once you are familiar with how WordPress works, it’s time to get creative and start customizing. The tutorial now splits into different subjects that require no order. From here on you can do whatever you want, adding and subtracting, perfecting and scrambling your site at will. The amount of effort you put into the site is now up to you. You can work with the two WordPress Themes that came with the installation, or seek out another Theme that better meets your needs. Or you can create your own Child Theme. You can totally customize all the links and information, or get serious and completely re-design the entire site to do whatever you want. You have the basics, the rest is up to your imagination.

Finding a WordPress Theme
Look for one that better suits the look you desire on your site.
Customizing the Look
When you are ready to plunge into the code, you can customize the look and layout of your site through CSS and modifying the Themes (or create your own). If your customizing goals are not seriously extensive, a good bet would be to develop your own Child Theme. A minimal Child Theme is a fairly simple project if you have a little coding experience.
Enhance Your Site with Plugins
Plugins add function and sometimes fun to your site. There are hundreds of different plugins for adding custom links like related articles to your sidebar to adding weather reports. Just like Child Themes are an easy way to customize the look of your site, with a bit of coding experience, your own minimal Plugin is an easy way to change how your site works.

WordPress Themes

There are hundreds of WordPress Themes to choose from. All do basically the same thing but graphically present the information in a myriad of ways. Choose a few that look interesting to you, and meet your audience’s needs and your desires, and then test drive them following the test drive instructions above. Click through the whole site, the categories and archives as well as the individual posts to see how the Theme handles each one. The look may be nice on the front page, but if it handles things in a way you don’t like in the single post, then you will have to dig into the code and make changes. Not ready for that, try another theme.

If you run into problems, check out the Codex’s Troubleshooting Themes article.

Customizing The Look

If you are familiar with CSS, HTML, and even PHP and MySQL, consider either customizing the Theme to your own needs, or creating your own Child Theme. This is not for the timid, this is for the informed and experienced. That said, a Child Theme is an easy, safe way to tinker under the hood/bonnet of WordPress. If things go badly with your customizations, simply activate an approved, unmodified theme and your site is up and running and looking perfectly again. If you want to expand your website design and development skills, WE can help:

Customizing How It Works

If you are familiar with PHP, HTML, and maybe even MySQL, you may be able to customize WordPress to work the way you want. Again this is not for the timid, this is for the informed and experienced. And again, a simple basic Plugin is an easy, safe way to tinker under the hood of WordPress. If things go badly with your customizations, simply deactivate your balky Plugin and your site is up and running perfectly again. If you want to expand your website development skills, the Codex can help:

Introduction to Blogging what you should know before get started

Introduction to Blogging what you should know before get started

What is a “blog”?

“Blog” is an abbreviated version of “weblog,” which is a term used to describe websites that maintain an ongoing chronicle of information.

A blog features diary-type commentary and links to articles on other websites, usually presented as a list of entries in reverse chronological order. Blogs range from the personal to the political, and can focus on one narrow subject or a whole range of subjects.

Many blogs focus on a particular topic, such as web design, home staging, sports, or mobile technology. Some are more eclectic, presenting links to all types of other sites. And others are more like personal journals, presenting the author’s daily life and thoughts.

CHECK: 25 Legit Ways to Make Money Online Blogging with WordPress

Generally speaking (although there are exceptions), blogs tend to have a few things in common:

diagram

  • A main content area with articles listed chronologically, newest on top. Often, the articles are organized into categories.
  • An archive of older articles.
  • A way for people to leave comments about the articles.
  • A list of links to other related sites, sometimes called a “blogroll”.
  • One or more “feeds” like RSS, Atom or RDF files.

Some blogs may have additional features beyond these.

ALSO CHECK:What’s wordpress and it’s uses in CMS

What is a “blogger”?

A blogger is a person who owns or runs a blog or a person who maintains the blog. That is, posting articles or new posts, information, sharing the most up-to-date news, opinions and case studies to name but a few. Such entries are known as blog posts.

The Blog Content

Content is the raison d’être for any website. Retail sites feature a catalog of products. University sites contain information about their campuses, curriculum, and faculty. News sites show the latest news stories. For a personal blog, you might have a bunch of observations, or reviews. Without some sort of updated content, there is little reason to visit a website more than once.

On a blog, the content consists of articles (also sometimes called “posts” or “entries”) that the author(s) writes. Yes, some blogs have multiple authors, each writing his/her own articles. Typically, blog authors compose their articles in a web-based interface, built into the blogging system itself. Some blogging systems also support the ability to use stand-alone “weblog client” software, which allows authors to write articles offline and upload them at a later time.

MUST KNOW: Advantages and disadvantages of using wordpress to build CMS

Comments

Want an interactive website? Wouldn’t it be nice if the readers of a website could leave comments, tips or impressions about the site or a specific article? With blogs, they can! Posting comments is one of the most exciting features of blogs.

Most blogs have a method to allow visitors to leave comments. There are also nifty ways for authors of other blogs to leave comments without even visiting the blog! Called “pingbacks” or “trackbacks“, they can inform other bloggers whenever they cite an article from another site in their own articles. All this ensures that online conversations can be maintained painlessly among various site users and websites.

The Difference Between a Blog and CMS?

Software that provides a method of managing your website is commonly called a CMS or “Content Management System”. Many blogging software programs are considered a specific type of CMS. They provide the features required to create and maintain a blog, and can make publishing on the internet as simple as writing an article, giving it a title, and organizing it under (one or more) categories. While some CMS programs offer vast and sophisticated features, a basic blogging tool provides an interface where you can work in an easy and, to some degree, intuitive manner while it handles the logistics involved in making your composition presentable and publicly available. In other words, you get to focus on what you want to write, and the blogging tool takes care of the rest of the site management.

WordPress is one such advanced blogging tool and it provides a rich set of features. Through its Administration Screen, you can set options for the behavior and presentation of your weblog. Via these Administration Screen, you can easily compose a blog post, push a button, and be published on the internet, instantly! WordPress goes to great pains to see that your blog posts look good, the text looks beautiful, and the html code it generates conforms to web standards.

If you’re just starting out, read Getting Started with WordPress, which contains information on how to get WordPress set up quickly and effectively, as well as information on performing basic tasks within WordPress, like creating new posts or editing existing ones.

Things Bloggers Need to Know

In addition to understanding how your specific blogging software works, such as WordPress, there are some terms and concepts you need to know.

Archives

A blog is also a good way to keep track of articles on a site. A lot of blogs feature an archive based on dates (like a monthly or yearly archive). The front page of a blog may feature a calendar of dates linked to daily archives. Archives can also be based on categories featuring all the articles related to a specific category.

It does not stop there; you can also archive your posts by author or alphabetically. The possibilities are endless. This ability to organize and present articles in a composed fashion is much of what makes blogging a popular personal publishing tool.

Feeds

A Feed is a function of special software that allows “Feedreaders” to access a site automatically looking for new content and then post updates about that new content to another site. This provides a way for users to keep up with the latest and hottest information posted on different blogging sites. Some Feeds include RSS (alternately defined as “Rich Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”), Atom or RDF files. Dave Shea, author of the web design weblog Mezzoblue has written a comprehensive summary of feeds.

CHECK: Most 10 Best (Pay Per Click) PPC Sites Publisher Ad Networks For Bloggers

Syndication

A feed is a machine readable (usually XML) content publication that is updated regularly. Many weblogs publish a feed (usually RSS, but also possibly Atom and RDF and so on, as described above). There are tools out there that call themselves “feedreaders”. What they do is they keep checking specified blogs to see if they have been updated, and when the blogs are updated, they display the new post, and a link to it, with an excerpt (or the whole contents) of the post. Each feed contains items that are published over time. When checking a feed, the feedreader is actually looking for new items. New items are automatically discovered and downloaded for you to read, so you don’t have to visit all the blogs you are interested in. All you have to do with these feedreaders is to add the link to the RSS feed of all the blogs you are interested in. The feedreader will then inform you when any of the blogs have new posts in them. Most blogs have these “Syndication” feeds available for the readers to use.

 

Pretty Permalinks

Permalinks are the permanent URLs to your individual weblog posts, as well as categories and other lists of weblog postings. A permalink is what another weblogger will use to refer to your article (or section), or how you might send a link to your story in an e-mail message. Because others may link to your individual postings, the URL to that article shouldn’t change. Permalinks are intended to be permanent (valid for a long time).

“Pretty” Permalinks is the idea that URLs are frequently visible to the people who click them, and should therefore be crafted in such a way that they make sense, and not be filled with incomprehensible parameters. The best Permalinks are “hackable,” meaning a user might modify the link text in their browser to navigate to another section or listing of the weblog. For example, this is how the default Permalink to a story might look in a default WordPress installation:

/index.php?p=423

How is a user to know what “p” represents? Where did the number 423 come from?

In contrast, here is a well-structured, “Pretty” Permalink which could link to the same article, once the installation is configured to modify permalinks:

/archives/2003/05/23/my-cheese-sandwich/

One can easily guess that the Permalink includes the date of the posting, and the title, just by looking at the URL. One might also guess that hacking the URL to be /archives/2003/05/ would get a list of all the postings from May of 2003 (pretty cool). For more information on possible Permalink patterns in WordPress, see Using Permalinks.

Blog by email

Some blogging tools offer the ability to email your posts directly to your blog, all without direct interaction through the blogging tool interface. WordPress offers this cool feature. Using email, you can now send in your post content to a pre-determined email address & voila! Your post is published!

Post Slugs

If you’re using Pretty Permalinks, the Post Slug is the title of your article post within the link. The blogging tool software may simplify or truncate your title into a more appropriate form for using as a link. A title such as “I’ll Make A Wish” might be truncated to “ill-make-a-wish”. In WordPress, you can change the Post Slug to something else, like “make-a-wish”, which sounds better than a wish made when sick.

SEE: 25 Reasons Your Business Should Switch to WordPress

Excerpt

Excerpts are condensed summaries of your blog posts, with blogging tools being able to handle these in various ways. In WordPress, Excerpts can be specifically written to summarize the post, or generated automatically by using the first few paragraphs of a post or using the post up to a specific point, assigned by you.

Plugins

Plugins are cool bits of programming scripts that add additional functionality to your blog. These are often features which either enhance already available features or add them to your site.

WordPress offers simple and easy ways of adding Plugins to your blog. From the Administration Screen, there is a Plugins Screen. You can easily search, install and activate Plugins from this Screen.

Basics – A Few Blogging Tips

Starting a new blog is difficult and this can put many people off. Some may get off to a good start only to become quickly discouraged because of the lack of comments or visits. You want to stand out from this crowd of millions of bloggers, you want to be one of the few hundred thousand blogs that are actually visited. Here are some simple tips to help you on your way to blogging mastery:

  1. Post regularly, but don’t post if you have nothing worth posting about.
  2. Stick with only a few specific genres to talk about.
  3. Don’t put ‘subscribe’ and ‘vote me’ links all over the front page until you have people that like your blog enough to ignore them (they’re usually just in the way).
  4. Use a clean and simple theme if at all possible.
  5. Enjoy, blog for fun, comment on other peoples’ blogs (as they normally visit back).
  6. Have fun blogging and remember, there are no rules to what you post on your blog!

 

If you have any questions or enquires, please feel free to drop your comments

Download Free BESMA v1.0.5 – Bulk Email & SMS Marketing Application PHP Script

Hello,

some days ago, i promised to share this bulk email and sms sender script.

But before you download this script,

CHECK: 10 sure ways to make money online without stress

check the features below

Full Features

  • Client Management System
    • Add New Client
    • Client Manage
    • Set SMS or Email Quota For specific Client
  • Clients Group
    • All Groups
    • Add New Group
  • Invoices
    • All Invoices
    • Create New Invoice
  • Bulk Email
    • Send Bulk Email
    • Send Email From File
    • Email History
    • Email Providers
  • Bulk SMS
    • Send Bulk SMS
    • Send SMS From File
    • Send Schedule SMS
    • Send Schedule SMS From File
    • SMS History
    • 11+ SMS Gateways Integration
    • Set Different Prices for Different SMS Gateways
    • SMS Price Plan
    • Create SMS Price Plan
    • Add SMS Price Plan features
  • Support Tickets Management System
    • Create New Ticket
    • Create Support Department
    • Support Ticket Manage
    • Support Department Manage
    • Message Replay Between Administrator and Clients
    • Upload and Download Related Support Ticket Files
    • Change Support Department
    • Change Ticket Status ETC.

ALSO KNOW: How Your Web Hosting Affects Your Ranking in SEO Today

  • Settings
    • Add New Administrator
    • Administrator Manage
    • Administrator Role
    • Administrator Role Manage
    • 4 Payment Gateways
    • Email Templates Manage
    • Customize Your Company Information
    • Translate Your application To any Language Using Language Handler
    • Disable SMS or Email Options for specific clients or full systems
  • Others
    • Email Notifications
    • Different Panel For Client
    • Send Email or SMS From Client Panel
    • Request for Email Or SMS Quota using Payment Gateways
    • Responsive Design
  • And Many More….

 

Download besma v105 script here

 

Demo Instructions

 

For Admin Portal:

Login URL: https://kashem.me/demo/besma/admin/

User Name: admin

Password: admin.password

 

For Client Portal:

Login URL: https://kashem.me/demo/besma/

Email:client@coderpixel.com

Password: client.password

Note: this script is a premium script and i may take this post down at anytime.

 

Iff you encouter any problem, feel free to drop your comment…..

Shared wordpress flat visual chat premium plugin

Shared wordpress flat visual chat premium plugin

Hello some days ago, i promised to share this plugin but due to some issue i couldn’t.

Before we continue: check 19 Disadvantages of Using WordPress you must know

Today i’m going to share the plugin with you and its uses.

But before you download this plugin, you should know that Wordpress Flat Visual Chat plugin.

is a unique chat not only allows you to communicate with your customers,

Most See: Most 10 Best (Pay Per Click) PPC Sites Publisher Ad Networks For Bloggers

but also to guide them through the pages of the site showing them visually any element.

ALSO CHECK: Advantages and disadvantages of using wordpress to build CMS

WordPress Flat Visual chat has been coded using Real Time AJAX chat and industry best practise coding so there is no bloating to slow your site down.

Download WP_Visual_Chat plugin here